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 From:  Jim Thompson <jim at netgate dot com>
 To:  Alex M <radiussupport at lrcommunications dot net>
 Cc:  "Mono Dev List" <m0n0wall dash dev at lists dot m0n0 dot ch>
 Subject:  Re: [m0n0wall-dev] WRAP hardware for people working on 6.1 port
 Date:  Mon, 28 Aug 2006 21:30:26 -1000
On Aug 28, 2006, at 5:20 PM, Alex M wrote:

>> I'd start poking around the 'lmsensors' project.  see here, for
>> example: http://www.lm-sensors.org/wiki/HardwareHacking
>
> Ok will try to kill my MB as that article suggest :-P
>
>> No, you'ld want to be able to turn it off (the software would write
>> values over the i2c bus to make the speaker turn on/off.).
>
> Yea turning of the buzzle is easy, but how and when should I start it?

when the software says to, of course.

I assume you're using an Atmel AVR or similar in order to drive the LCD.
If so, I'd describe a command to the AVR to set the buzzer pattern.

Once set, the buzzer will constantly repeat the specified buzzer  
pattern until a new pattern is set (or theAVR is reset).

Format : <marker><bphigh><bplow>

bphigh - buzzer pattern high byte

bplow - buzzer pattern low byte

Each bit in the 16 bit pattern is cycled through on a continuous  
basis, a 1 in the 'current' bit position turns the buzzer on, a zero  
turns it off. In this way the buzzer can be made to generate a number  
of distinct patterns. Some useful patterns might include:

<0x0000> Buzzer off
<0xffff> Buzzer on continuously
<0x00ff> Continuous beeps, equal length and spacing
<0x0001> Continuous cycle of short beep, long space
<0x00aa> Continuous 4 short beeps followed by a space



This would allow the UI to sample the RSSI of a given 802.11  
interface and 'program' the buzzer to sound.  As the RSSI gets  
higher, the 'value' sent to the controller gets numerically higher.    
The UI can also turn the speaker 'off'.



>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jim Thompson [mailto:jim at netgate dot com]
> Sent: Monday, August 28, 2006 11:10 PM
> To: Alex M
> Cc: Mono Dev List
> Subject: Re: [m0n0wall-dev] WRAP hardware for people working on 6.1  
> port
>
>
> On Aug 28, 2006, at 5:03 PM, Alex M wrote:
>
>>
>>> "Your desktop should have an i2c port in it somewhere already.   its
>>> used to read the ram timing of the dimms "
>>
>> Ok, definetly never seen a conector for I2C on my motherboard, if
>> there is
>> no connector how can I find it? How can I find info about IRQ its
>> address?
>
> I'd start poking around the 'lmsensors' project.  see here, for
> example: http://www.lm-sensors.org/wiki/HardwareHacking
>
>
>>> Same thing as the array of LEDs.   You make the pitch of the tone go
>>> up (or the duration of the break between tones go down)
>>> as the RSSI goes up.
>>> That way you can hear it without opening the case.  :-)
>>
>> Sure, do you want buzzele to produce the noise all the time? If not
>> there
>> should be a button to activate it to check the signal, but then if
>> I have
>> opening for the button I can add LEDs... I see your point but its
>> not yet
>> convincing me especially because I have to put extra frequency
>> generator and
>> or more expansive controller $1.5 increase I cost for extra part is
>> extra
>> $1500 for my lot :-(
>
> No, you'ld want to be able to turn it off (the software would write
> values over the i2c bus to make the speaker turn on/off.).
> You'ld also want to be able to use the same PZ speaker for more than
> one radio, but again, this is just software.
>
> Jim